Pain & gain 2

Pain & Gain 2 Inhaltsverzeichnis

Daniel Lugo führt in Miami ein heruntergekommenes Fitness-Center, mit dem er gerade so über die Runden kommt. Um endlich an das große Geld zu kommen, plant er mit den nicht ganz so hellen Bodybuildern Adrian und Paul, den wohlhabenden. Pain & Gain (auf Dt. wörtlich übersetzt: Schmerz und Gewinn) ist eine US-​amerikanische Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Handlung; 2 Hintergrund; 3 Synchronisation; 4 Abweichungen von der Realität; 5 Kritiken; 6 Weblinks; 7 Einzelnachweise. Pain & Gain Trailer. Pain & Gain ein Film von Michael Bay mit Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson, Ed Harris. - UhrVor 2 Jahren aktualisiert In der Action-Komödie Pain & Gain von Michael Bay nimmt die Absurdität stellenweise unfassbare Ausmaße. Mark Wahlberg wird wegen "Pain & Gain" verklagt Johnson (41) in den Hauptrollen in die deutschen Kinos: Pain & Gain war der wohlklingende Titel und nicht nur hierzulande ein Kassenschlager. Artikel - vor 2 Monaten.

pain & gain 2

Pain and Gain. ‪‬. Komödie, ‪Drama‬. ‪2 Std. 9 Min.‬. ‪Deutsch Audio‬. ‪FSK16‬. ​. Michael Bay inszeniert seine muskelstrotzende Actionkomödie als. puttingguide.se - Kaufen Sie Pain & Gain (IMPORT) (Keine deutsche Version) günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden. Mark Wahlberg wird wegen "Pain & Gain" verklagt Johnson (41) in den Hauptrollen in die deutschen Kinos: Pain & Gain war der wohlklingende Titel und nicht nur hierzulande ein Kassenschlager. Artikel - vor 2 Monaten. pain & gain 2

Pain & Gain 2 Video

Pain and Gain Official Trailer #1 (2013) - Michael Bay Movie HD Pain and Gain. ‪‬. Komödie, ‪Drama‬. ‪2 Std. 9 Min.‬. ‪Deutsch Audio‬. ‪FSK16‬. ​. Michael Bay inszeniert seine muskelstrotzende Actionkomödie als. Hier erfährst du, bei welchen Anbietern du Pain & Gain streamen kannst! Natürlich haben wir auch viele weitere Infos zu Pain & Gain für dich. puttingguide.se - Kaufen Sie Pain & Gain günstig ein. Qualifizierte Amazon's Choice für "pain and gain dvd" 2 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich. puttingguide.se - Kaufen Sie Pain & Gain (IMPORT) (Keine deutsche Version) günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden. 10 9 kein 8 Geschäftsmodell PGI < 2: 7 Geschäftsmodell nicht erfolgreich 6 5 4 PG PGI (PAIN-GAIN-Index) = GAIN / PAIN Quelle: Eigene Darstellung Bezogen​. pain & gain 2 Ed hat sich mittlerweile beim Sun Gym angemeldet, um mehr über das Trio zu erfahren, und teilt der Polizei seine Erkenntnisse mit. Mark Wahlberg Daniel Lugo. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Veröffentlichungsjahr Tony Shalhoub Victor Kershaw. Im Verlauf des Kampfs movie spiderman sich versehentlich eines https://puttingguide.se/filme-deutsch-stream/sirene-englisch.php Gewichte opinion auswandern nach italien removed der Hantelbank, als Franks Kopf pity, entwicklung kind 5 jahre are darunter liegt und zertrümmert ihm den Kopf. Rainer Gerlach. Da er laut eigener Aussage zu erschöpft gewesen sei, um sich selbst vor Gericht zu verteidigen, bekannte er sich schuldig und musste für yardД±m filme fahri Monate ins Gefängnis. Nachdem er click die Täter vor Gericht aussagte, wurde Schiller wenig später selbst vom FBI verhaftet, da er durch Krankenversicherungsbetrug ungefähr 14 Millionen Dollar eingenommen haben soll.

Pain & Gain 2 Video

Transformers: L'âge de l'extinction (VF)

One thing to consider: The Riskrunner rewarded for this quest is a Powerful version, which means it comes with a significantly higher light level than what should normally drop for you.

Without getting into the nitty-gritty, Powerful drops are sometimes best left for after you've reached the new soft-cap of light level Once you get there, only Powerful loot will be an upgrade for you.

If you really want to min-max your grinding, it might be worth waiting until you're before grabbing Riskrunner to ensure that it's the most powerful version you can get.

Or you can just grab it now because it's cool as hell. Before you can take on Pain and Gain, you need to complete the first story mission for the Shadowkeep expansion.

This is simple: Just go to the Moon and the mission will automatically begin. Once you've completed it, you can head back to the Tower.

Banshee, the Gunsmith, will have the Pain and Gain quest waiting for you. Completing this first step of the quest is ridiculously simple and requires doing daily activities that any veteran will blitz through with ease.

If you're new, here's a more specific breakdown:. Go into your inventory and track this new quest, which takes you to the EDZ on Earth.

This quest can be launched directly from the EDZ map of Earth, and it takes you back to the Cosmodrome area that new Destiny 2 players fight through.

This part of the quest is very easy to follow. You'll make your way to a large battlefield where a spider tank periodically spawns and you are tasked with killing three Dusk Captains that also spawn sporadically.

Killing the three captains gives you a new quest marker that takes you into a secret area with a jumping puzzle. Everything here is clearly marked, so it's really hard to get lost.

At the end of the jumping puzzle, the quest marker will direct you to pick up an object on a table that turns out to be the Riskrunner SMG.

I honestly enjoyed this movie, it was fun to watch at times. However, I can't say I enjoyed every single bit of it.

Some parts, such as the kidnapping, were exciting to watch. Then there were other scenes that didn't quite make much sense.

I sat through a few scenes where I thought "what's the point here? Aside from this, this movie is very quotable, and had some memorable lines by Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson.

The two showed some good comedic chemistry in many scenes and it made the film more enjoyable. Some people may be offended by this film because it's a comedy that takes horrific events that occurred in real life and turns them into comedic situations.

However, I kinda like the idea of the film being a comedy. I think the director made this film a comedy because of the characters and their stupidity.

Mark Wahlberg plays Daniel Lugo, the owner of the fitness center Sun Gym and the leader of the gang who does the kidnapping.

These characters were not very smart and their attempts on kidnapping, stealing, and murder often lead to unwanted results.

The characters' stupidity is kinda what made the movie entertaining and somewhat funny. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends.

Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites.

User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits.

Alternate Versions. Rate This. A trio of bodybuilders in Florida get caught up in an extortion ring and a kidnapping scheme that goes terribly wrong.

Director: Michael Bay. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. My Action Movies. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin.

Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Mark Wahlberg Daniel Lugo Dwayne Johnson Paul Doyle Anthony Mackie Adrian Doorbal Tony Shalhoub Victor Kershaw Ed Harris Ed DuBois Rob Corddry John Mese Bar Paly Sorina Luminita Rebel Wilson Robin Peck Ken Jeong Jonny Wu Michael Rispoli Frank Griga Keili Lefkovitz Krisztina Furton Emily Rutherfurd Pastor Randy Tony Plana Captain Lopez Peter Stormare Learn more More Like This.

Action Comedy Thriller. The Other Guys Action Comedy Crime.

Pain and Gain. Dabei more info wieder einmal ein Streit zwischen Danny und Adrian aus. Michael Bay Regisseur. Https://puttingguide.se/filme-deutsch-stream/das-beste-netz-2019.php erzählt den Https://puttingguide.se/neue-filme-stream/philipp-kadelbach.php im Krankenhaus die Wahrheit, ihm wird jedoch click here geglaubt. Im wahren Leben war der Source allerdings nicht so unterbelichtet, wie die von Mark Wahlberg gespielte Figur in Michael Bays Film dargestellt wird.

Any strangers seen coming and going would be foreign diplomats, most of them from the Caribbean. The gang acted neighborly, borrowing tools and returning them promptly.

They began paying homeowner-association dues. Tom impressed one neighborhood couple by climbing up a tall ladder to change a front-porch light bulb two stories above their welcome mat.

He asked another neighbor to accept delivery of packages delivered to the Schiller house if no one was home.

The neighbor accepted twelve UPS deliveries and handed them over without question. Lugo visited The Spy Shop on Biscayne Boulevard -- where three months before, the gang had bought stun guns, handcuffs, and other tools of the Schiller kidnapping -- this time to upgrade the home-security system.

He hired gardeners to add shrubbery and a dense mass of bougainvillea. Increasingly the house was becoming a home.

Weekes began sleeping over for days at a time. Sometimes Doorbal crashed there as well. Doorbal had his eyes on Beatriz Weiland, a Hungarian import and exotic dancer.

Within the competitive environment of female pulchritude at Solid Gold, other performers said Beatriz -- with her big blue eyes, perfect complexion, and full-busted, slim-hipped body -- was one of the most beautiful women in the world.

Lugo set his sights on one of the strippers, too. He'd become enamored of Sabina Petrescu, a year-old dancer who'd modeled for Penthouse.

In she'd scored runner-up in the Miss Romania contest and now longed for life as an actress in the West. For a while she worked as a cocktail waitress in San Diego, until a talent scout approached her about modeling gigs in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and New York.

The assignments had all required Sabina to remove her clothes, usually while she danced on a stage. Eventually she wound up in Miami.

The two men certainly had the physiques to match their dream girls: They were incredibly strong, with muscles developed to almost monstrous proportions.

Lugo had a broad forehead, brilliant smile, and dark-stubbled jaw. He possessed tremendous charm and a great deal of money: a million already from an old Medicare fraud scheme and now all of Schiller's assets.

Although Doorbal was shorter than Lugo, he too had the build of a professional weight lifter, his muscle striations enhanced by his dark skin.

He sported a thick head of wavy black hair that fell almost to his waist. Indeed Lugo's sidekick from Trinidad resembled some carved Caribbean virility god.

The Champagne Room was an elevated area within the club that separated the big spenders from the proles below.

There was more cuddling and nuzzling -- it was expected and allowed -- in the demimonde of the Champagne Room.

Here most of the high rollers, an assortment of pro athletes, drug dealers, tourist businessmen, arms merchants, mobsters, and B-movie actors, were surrounded by several girls.

Sabina remembered Lugo. He liked to slip dollar bills into her garter belt while she danced in a cage.

Now, surrounded by a phalanx of provocative strippers, he was telling her he only wanted to talk.

He was in the music business, he said, and wanted to feature her in a video he'd be filming in London. As the conversation progressed, he periodically handed her twenties.

When he said goodbye, she gave him a kiss. It was a start. Within a week they were dating, and soon a relationship bloomed. Lugo warned Sabina that the other men at Solid Gold just wanted to take advantage of her.

Sabina wouldn't have to dance naked anymore. He'd take care of her. In the years since his divorce, he said, he had never felt so close to a woman.

They began living together. It was convenient for Lugo; he could drive just a few miles and be back home with his pregnant wife, Lucretia Goodridge.

At first everything went well. Something like love, or maybe love itself, flowered. But Sabina didn't understand Lugo's odd hours, his occasional trips to the Bahamas.

Why would a music-video producer need night-vision binoculars? And what was happening with that London video shoot he'd promised?

She was growing bored in her gilded cage. There had to be more to do than shop and see her hairdresser. Sabina's frustrations persisted; she demanded an explanation.

I'm with the Central Intelligence Agency. One fell apart in a London hotel, and the Company left him on his own to survive on leftovers from room-service trays.

Lugo swore her to secrecy, and the beautiful Sabina, raised in Romania on a steady diet of American movies, was happy to oblige.

A fan of action thrillers, particularly James Bond films, she now had her own real-life man of international intrigue.

The spy who loved her even gave her a specialized code for her beeper: When she saw "" appear on the screen, she knew Lugo was trying to contact her.

By now Adrian Doorbal also had moved nearby, to a two-story townhouse apartment a block away on Main Street. Lugo told her the Company figured it was smarter to have the team in close proximity in case they had to act swiftly.

And when the guys disappeared for a few days now and then, it was because they were constantly on call; they had to report to headquarters in Langley, Virginia, at a moment's notice.

They had no say in when or why; the life of a secret agent wasn't always glamorous. Doorbal hadn't yet scored a date with Beatriz from Solid Gold, but he did have a steady girl.

He'd been dating Cindy Eldridge, whom he'd met at Sundays on the Bay restaurant in Key Biscayne nine months before, on the occasion of her surprise birthday party.

The year-old Boca Raton nurse, a pretty blond fitness enthusiast, was taken with the stranger she chanced to meet at her party. And why wouldn't she be?

He was a personal trainer, he told her, and co-owned a gym; he was interested in nutrition and bodybuilding. They both liked fast cars, too.

Cindy had a red Corvette. The personal trainer and the nurse had begun dating right away. Soon Doorbal proposed marriage, but Cindy declined -- she was older than he, and they didn't really know each other well enough.

The commute between Boca and Miami limited their contact, but Doorbal saw her most weekends and sometimes during the week.

Still, she didn't know the real sacrifices he was making for their relationship, those visits he crammed in between Schiller's beatings at the warehouse.

That winter of their problems began. Cindy wanted to move to Miami so they'd have more time together.

Besides, the distance gave him time to pursue Beatriz. And there were more problems: Doorbal began having mood swings.

He'd abruptly change his mind on any manner of subject. Worse and there was no delicate way for her to bring this up , he was a flop in the sack.

His libido was limp. But Cindy attributed these dark clouds to his steroid use; for bodybuilders it almost was an occupational hazard. She guided him to Dr.

Eric Lief in Coral Springs, who specialized in treating long-term steroid abusers with hormone therapy. But the day finally came when Doorbal told her he just couldn't see her again.

She was devastated. He was surprised but glad to learn Schiller was safe and healing. Schiller was on his way to Colombia, to rejoin his family, but wanted to hire the detective to look into his kidnapping.

Du Bois told him to write down everything he could remember about his abduction and torture, and to send any documentation he could gather.

A few days later Schiller flew to Colombia. Still on crutches, he was a mess physically and mentally.

He'd lost 40 pounds and was down to He had nightmares of that helpless, horrific month in the warehouse. He'd erupt in crying jags in the middle of everyday events.

As he convalesced he also tried to put his financial life back together. With the help of his Miami attorney, Schiller discovered momentous changes in the family's lifestyle.

His Schlotzsky's Deli franchise had been dissolved. The house now belonged to a Nassau, Bahamas, corporation he knew nothing about.

His checking account was empty. He began compiling documents that followed the transfers of his property to mysterious offshore companies and people he had never met.

The MetLife change-of-beneficiary policy gave him a laugh, one of the few since his kidnapping. Sure, he'd signed the form, but his signature didn't even run along the line.

It rose almost perpendicular, pointing like a rocket off a launch pad. Several of his canceled checks displayed similar strange signature alignments; he couldn't believe his bank had honored them.

And just who was this Lillian Torres, to whom he'd signed over his two-million-dollar life insurance policy and the investment in his La Gorce Palace luxury condominium?

During Super Bowl week Schiller's letter arrived at Du Bois's office, detailing his brutal ordeal and his certainty that Jorge Delgado, his former business partner and friend, was involved.

He also named Daniel Lugo, an associate of Delgado, as one of his captors. Du Bois had no idea who those guys were, but the paper trail led straight to the heart of his professional and personal history.

The documents attached to the letter -- copies of title and account transfers -- had been witnessed and notarized by John Mese, an old Miami Shores acquaintance.

Du Bois called Schiller and told him that he knew John Mese. He couldn't begin looking into the case until the following week, after the Super Bowl, when he'd wind up his work as the NFL's top security consultant for the Miami extravaganza.

He attended the opulent Commissioner's Ball and walked the sidelines during the big game. But Schiller's tale filtered through the festivities.

The man's lonely suffering was bizarre and unsettling. John Mese was the starting point of the Schiller file.

Du Bois knew him as an accountant, a former bodybuilder, the owner of Sun Gym, and a promoter of bodybuilding competitions.

In fact Mese occasionally had used his detective agency. The two men cut similar figures in the intimate Miami Shores community.

Both were handsome, strong, hard-working, and prosperous. They had pretty wives and wholesome kids. For five years in the Seventies they'd had offices across the street from each other in the Shores' intimate business district.

Du Bois simply could not picture a dark side to him. If anything he thought Mese was a decent, harmless guy whose true passion, bodybuilding, sometimes intruded on his day job.

He must have been conned. He couldn't have witnessed Schiller's signatures unless he was present at the warehouse where Schiller had been held captive and tortured.

But if he was there, Du Bois wondered, how did he ever get hooked up with those guys? How could he have gotten mixed up in something as cruel and unsavory as the Schiller abduction?

Du Bois called Mese and asked for a meeting, adding cryptically that it might be the most important appointment of his life.

Du Bois expected to wrap the whole thing up quickly. The meeting took place on February 2, , at Mese's Miami Shores office.

At 57 years old, he was no longer the chiseled muscleman of old. He now resembled a white-haired Norman Rockwell grandfather poised over the Christmas turkey.

Mese didn't know anyone named Marc Schiller. Du Bois handed him Schiller's letter, studying his face as he read. There wasn't much to discern.

Did he know Jorge Delgado and Daniel Lugo? To the detective's surprise Mese said yes, Lugo was employed at his gym, and Delgado worked out there.

Besides that, they were hard-working businessmen and clients of his. He'd represented both before the IRS.

Du Bois handed him a copy of the quit-claim deed to Schiller's house, and Schiller's MetLife change-of-beneficiary form. Mese had notarized both.

In all Mese had witnessed and notarized more than two million dollars of Schiller's assets in the past few months. The accountant's memory suddenly improved.

Du Bois then pointed to another signature on the deed, that of "Diana Schiller. She'd left the United States on November But her signature appeared on documents dated November 23 and Mese hesitated.

Well, he said, his recollection was vague about the circumstances surrounding Diana Schiller's signature. Perhaps it was signed before he received the papers, or maybe something screwy had happened.

He agreed to set up a meeting with Lugo and Delgado to straighten out the matter. A second meeting was set up for February 13, again at Mese's Miami Shores office.

This time Du Bois took precautions. If Lugo and Delgado had committed terrible crimes against Schiller, they were capable of anything. Early in the morning Du Bois rounded the corner past his house and stopped in to see his best friend, Ed O'Donnell, a veteran criminal lawyer.

O'Donnell had worked as a major-crimes prosecutor in the State Attorney's Office before switching to private practice.

Du Bois told him about the gang, the letter, the documents, his fears. If something happened to him this morning, he wanted the attorney to know the identity of those at the meeting, and the circumstances that took him there.

Ed Seibert's career included stints as a Washington, D. After retiring he freelanced as a security consultant in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Colombia from the mids through He'd planned logistics for the Nicaraguan contras and worked as a ballistics expert and weapons instructor for pro-democracy movements.

Now he maintained a quiet life in Miami and was active in his church. As Seibert read the Schiller memo on the way to Mese's office, the brutality of the Sun Gym gang reminded him of his years in Latin America, where such incidents were the common consequence of business, ideology, or drugs.

This doesn't happen in America, he thought. Then he adjusted his thinking: This is Miami. Everything goes.

But like Du Bois, he noticed something odd -- there was no ransom request. Schiller, it seemed, was completely disposable.

As usual Du Bois didn't carry a gun. As usual Seibert carried two. The detective already had checked out the building's entrances with his own investigators, whose cell phones were programmed to speed-dial the police and emergency services.

When everyone was in place, he and Seibert walked in for the appointment. A short time later Mese strolled through to announce Delgado was on his way.

Du Bois pulled out a photo of Schiller and asked Mese if he looked familiar. No, Mese couldn't say for sure this was the guy who came to his office with the documents for notarization.

Delgado arrived alone and Du Bois quickly sized him up. His demeanor was meek; he possessed few if any of the ingredients that establish a strong first impression.

He was thin even, certainly not the goon they were expecting. Mese made the introductions, ushered them into an empty office, and left.

Delgado asked to see Schiller's letter as well as the house deed and the change-of-beneficiary form. He took his time inspecting them before handing the papers back to Du Bois.

His tone, his attitude began to grate on the detective. Du Bois jabbed a thick index finger in Delgado's face.

You had his family leave the country, him playing a role about a young girl and a midlife crisis. You had his phone calls diverted from his home to the warehouse, where you had him chained to a wall.

Schiller is alive and well, and we are going to put your ass in jail! Mese rejoined the discussion now, and Delgado, who suddenly was conciliatory and seemed to want out of the room fast, suggested another meeting.

He'd bring in Lugo tomorrow to explain the whole situation. They'd meet at Mese's branch office in Miami Lakes.

The detective decided to drop his back-up team simply because Delgado had cut such an unimpressive figure. Outside the building he glanced at the tenant directory.

A mortgage firm, JoMar Properties, was on the third floor. It was Delgado's company, a holdover from the days when he and Marc Schiller were partners.

Mese was late, and neither Delgado nor Lugo were there. Mese's office was open, however, so they went in. The reception room was dominated by a popcorn machine topped with a glass bubble, and chess sets everywhere -- wood, brass, marble, onyx.

Du Bois beat Seibert in two quick games. Growing bored, the detective stepped out to the balcony for some fresh air. Seibert decided to take a walk through the office complex.

He went upstairs to check out JoMar Properties. The office was closed. Odd for a weekday, he thought. Mese finally showed at a.

It was as if he'd stumbled into fellow members of an Edison High School alumni group while touring Calcutta. We set it up yesterday, remember?

Now where are Lugo and Delgado? Mese hastened to assure him the two were on their way. In the interim the detective could go over his client files on Sun Gym, take whatever notes he needed, and request photocopies of anything important.

He escorted Du Bois and Seibert to a vacant room and seated them at a desk cluttered with an overflowing ashtray and two champagne glasses stained with the sweet residue of a cordial.

Then he left them alone. Du Bois quickly reviewed the papers, an unremarkable collection of corporate filings, nothing significant.

Bored, Seibert began going through the trash can under the desk. He knew garbage could be golden. And sure enough most of the discarded paper contained references to Sun Gym and the Schiller abduction suspects.

They begin to sort through the windfall, spreading papers out on the desk. Du Bois set aside some of the documents, and Seibert got up and locked the door.

Amazingly Mese had ushered them into the room Lugo used for his own office, the very room, in fact, where the gang had planned Schiller's kidnapping.

Now it held damaging links between Mese and the abduction. Glancing at the champagne glasses and the ashtray, Du Bois believed two people had been up all night throwing this stuff away.

They must have assumed the cleaning crew would be in later. Du Bois was incredulous. The money had to represent a portion of Schiller's stolen fortune.

In part the payees included the cast of characters who starred in the Schiller abduction. Thirty grand alone went to Carl Weekes.

The U. Lugo still was on parole and couldn't possibly explain the sudden acquisition of 70 grand on his Sun Gym salary.

So his boss, Mese, had purchased the cashier's check. Mese attached a letter stating he'd paid that much for a software program Lugo created for the gym.

Du Bois and Seibert couldn't believe their good fortune. This was like striking oil with the thrust of a teaspoon.

They began stuffing the papers into their jacket pockets until they realized there simply was too much product.

They filled their briefcases and then unlocked the door. If Du Bois ever harbored doubt about Mese's involvement, it was now gone. He believed his old pal was the CFO of a torture-for-profit gang.

At last Jorge Delgado showed up, alone, and Du Bois, buoyed by Mese's colossal mistake, launched into his list of accusations.

That sounded as sweet as a confession to Du Bois. The return was conditional, Delgado explained. First Du Bois and Schiller would have to sign an agreement that they'd never repeat the story to anyone, certainly not the police.

The detective agreed to talk to his client, and Delgado proposed a brief contract. The meeting was over. Seibert grew even more serious on the drive back to Du Bois's office.

Even if these guys could buy their way of out Schiller's suffering, he warned, they'd do it again to someone else.

They'd gotten the taste. And he gave her some good news: They were going to take some time off and go to Orlando. Not only was he at Disney World with a beautiful woman, but he'd received great news himself.

He announced to Sabina the official end of his federal probation. Sabina didn't even wonder how he could be both on federal probation and a CIA agent; the contradiction eluded her.

She was just enormously happy for Lugo -- happier even than he was, she said -- as they drove their rented convertible back to Miami.

But the appearance of Du Bois into his serene, post-Schiller existence had begun to rattle Sabina's man of mystery.

One day he received a call from Lillian Torres, she of the two-million-dollar MetLife change-of-beneficiary form.

An investigator from Du Bois's office had shown up on her doorstep, asking nosy questions.

They'd made the connection, which hardly was a stretch, between her and Lugo. His ex-wife Torres had been in on the scheme.

How long would it take for them to reach current wife Lucretia Goodridge, who had witnessed Schiller in captivity? So outraged was Lugo that he called together his cohorts and railed against Schiller and the detective.

They were ruining his life. His obsession with Schiller only intensified. One night he showed Sabina a purloined video of a birthday party Schiller had staged for his son, back when the family still lived in Old Cutler Cove.

It was a big party, with clowns, cakes, decorations, and presents. By now Du Bois had laid out the gang's proposition to Schiller.

But his client wasn't impressed. In fact he thought the offer was no more than a stall tactic while they tried to find him. He had no doubts they'd kill him if they did.

On the other hand, he was desperate for cash. And he wanted to go to the cops. What if he could get the money and then go to the police?

That way, when the guys were arrested, he wouldn't have to watch them use his money to pay off their lawyers.

Du Bois and Schiller agreed that if they were going to pursue the "payoff," they needed to consult an attorney. Du Bois went back to his friend Ed O'Donnell.

The former prosecutor was stunned that Delgado would even ask for such an agreement. More important, O'Donnell said, the "agreement of silence" was unenforceable.

Besides, it was a confession Schiller could take straight to the police. But the Sun Gym gang did find a lawyer: Joel Greenberg, a Plantation attorney in his first year of practice.

What Greenberg didn't know was that Lugo, in what the gang considered a stroke of financial genius, had devised a scheme to bamboozle Schiller.

He planned to alter the contract to read 1. When Greenberg was let in on the plot, he balked. He'd write the contract, yes, but he wasn't going to get involved with the ridiculous lira gambit.

The young attorney did provide Lugo with a contract stripped of dollar signs; if Lugo wanted to add the lire, he could. The days dragged on and drafts of the contract were faxed between the two camps.

Schiller agreed to every new revision, but there was no money coming in. With legal threats heating up, the gang knew it was time to get out with what they could.

For the heavy work, Lugo hired a Sun Gym weight lifter who, like Schiller's neighbors, believed the house belonged to Lugo.

Even the family photo albums and videos. They even removed the light-switch covers. Finally they drove off with Diana's BMW station wagon the gang enlisted the help of yet another Sun Gym weight lifter, who altered the car's vehicle identification number.

As soon as Schiller won back the title to his house the gang decided they'd better not respond to his challenge he sent Du Bois to have a look.

The kitchen remained intact; there was even baby food in the refrigerator. Otherwise the place was bare. It was eerie, this housecleaning job, thought Du Bois, as though Schiller and his family never existed.

All the trappings of a lifetime were gone. Back then they'd lost only their windows and doors, and part of their roof.

The detective placed a call to Colombia to deliver the bad news. The goods ended up at Delgado's Hialeah warehouse -- the same warehouse where they'd kept Schiller chained to a wall all those weeks.

Now the gang met to divide the bounty. Doorbal got the leather furniture and the large-screen TV. Lugo took the dining-room table and some paintings.

He presented them to Sabina. A few days later, when she learned it all came from that bad guy Marc Schiller's house, she said she didn't want it.

But soon after that, when she flew back to Romania to tell her parents she was happy, prosperous, and engaged, Lugo moved even more loot into their apartment.

Sabina was thrilled, until the rainy day when she realized she couldn't operate the wiper blade on the rear window. A sushi restaurant was nearby, and she pulled in.

She could sip on some sake, she figured, while she leafed through the operator's manual. But the first thing she saw when she opened the booklet was the name "Marc Schiller" listed as owner.

Flustered, she drank more sake. This was unexpected, unwelcome information. She confronted Lugo later that night. Yeah, he said, the BMW used to belong to Schiller.

Meanwhile Du Bois's wife and their children began to notice bulky strangers sitting in cars, watching their Miami Shores house.

You didn't have to be Sherlock Holmes, or even Watson, to find Du Bois at his Shores residence; he was listed in the phone book.

But when a phone-company security supervisor alerted him that someone was trying to gain access to his records for calls to South America, he really began to worry.

Did the gang think he could lead them to Schiller? He knew they were capable of anything if they wanted Schiller badly enough.

If they'd bought eavesdropping and surveillance equipment, were they using it on his family? Du Bois had to admit his client was right: Lugo and Delgado never planned to return the money.

The meetings and the faxes sent through Mese's office had been a stall. Now it was time to go to the police. He called Schiller first. Then he called John Mese and told him the deal was off.

Du Bois called Metro-Dade homicide Capt. Al Harper, one of his Miami Shores acquaintances and a year veteran of the police department.

SID conducted all major investigations involving fraud, drug trafficking, contract killings, criminal conspiracy, and organized crime.

SID agreed to review the case. Kevin Long. The private investigator didn't launch right into the details; he wanted first to establish Schiller as a credible victim.

Would SID prepare a polygraph for his client? As a polygraph examiner since , Du Bois knew this would be the most effective demonstration that Schiller's weird, brutal story was true.

Sure, Long said, and then sat back to listen as Du Bois went over the case and what he knew of the suspects.

If Schiller agreed to come back to Miami, Long said, he would see him and take the complaint. No problem, said Du Bois, but Schiller was afraid for his life and wanted to make the trip as brief as possible.

They set up a three-day interview window: April 18 to 20, He brought along a Colombian relative for protection, and walked straight from the airplane to Concourse E, where the hotel is located.

That afternoon Du Bois met his client for the first time. The two men shook hands, and Du Bois noted that Schiller was thin but otherwise a physically unremarkable man, except for a deep burgundy notch on his nose, a souvenir of the duct tape that had been wrapped so tightly around his head during his captivity.

Schiller was invigorated by the decision to go to the police. But he also was wary, afraid he might die in Miami.

At the SID office, they were met by Sgt. Gary Porterfield, who asked Schiller to wait outside while he talked to Du Bois in his office.

Du Bois handed over a copy of the case file, then began the narrative of his investigation. As Porterfield took notes, Du Bois outlined the history: Marc Schiller disappeared on the afternoon of November 14, During his captivity, he signed over everything he owned to individuals connected with Sun Gym.

On December 15 he reappeared, broken, in the emergency room at Jackson Memorial Hospital. Others were involved as well. They'd be easy to track down and question.

He also gave Porterfield a twenty-page memo and canceled checks, deed transfers, accident reports, and hospital records.

And he had a copy of Lugo's federal rap sheet and divorce documents. An hour later Porterfield summoned Schiller to provide a statement.

He too spent an hour with the sergeant. Porterfield promised to spend the next day investigating the case. They planned to polygraph Schiller on Thursday.

The next day, however, Porterfield called with bad news. There were scheduling difficulties. Would Schiller stay over until Friday morning for the polygraph?

Schiller canceled his flight and made a new reservation for Friday afternoon. Instead Porterfield met them with more bad news: SID wasn't going to take the case after all; they'd decided to refer it to the robbery bureau.

The robbery bureau? Du Bois was dumbfounded. You're shit-canning this case. Porterfield said his supervisor, Lt. Ed Petow, had concluded that the basic elements of the case were robbery.

Yeah, Du Bois thought, and Oswald was guilty of illegally discharging a firearm in a public place. Du Bois knew he'd just heard the death knell to any serious investigation.

Worse yet, it would leave the goons on the street. They still had Schiller's money, but when that ran out, they'd snatch and torture someone else.

Porterfield led them to Metro-Dade Police headquarters, a couple of miles away, as Du Bois followed in his car.

Schiller couldn't believe they'd blown him off after the information they'd provided. Du Bois tried to cheer him up but was in shock himself.

In the short drive to police headquarters, the solid professional landscape he'd cultivated over the past two decades had metamorphosed into a surreal, receding mirage.

As Porterfield escorted them to the robbery bureau, Du Bois noticed a lone detective seated in the waiting area. The man was smirking at them and softly clapping his hands.

Schiller went to his interview, and Porterfield walked off down the hall with the detective who'd just applauded their arrival. Du Bois approached the bureau's secretary.

Schiller today. That's it, Du Bois, thought. This investigation is doomed. SID had poisoned the Schiller case.

But why? He had to get outside for some air. He had to think. It was there, on a balcony, that homicide Capt. Al Harper, who'd first suggested the case go to SID, came upon him.

Du Bois was pacing, confused and angry. Schiller was having a rough time of his own with Sgt. Jim Maier, head of a task force designed to stop tourist robbers, and robbery Det.

Iris Deegan. Three times during the interview, Deegan interrupted to warn him it was a crime to file a false complaint. After he reconnects with an awkward pal from high school through Facebook, a mild-mannered accountant is lured into the world of international espionage.

John Bennett, a man whose childhood wish of bringing his teddy bear to life came true, now must decide between keeping the relationship with the bear or his girlfriend, Lori.

Having endured his legendary twelve labors, Hercules, the Greek demigod, has his life as a sword-for-hire tested when the King of Thrace and his daughter seek his aid in defeating a tyrannical warlord.

The G. Joes are not only fighting their mortal enemy Cobra; they are forced to contend with threats from within the government that jeopardize their very existence.

After being betrayed and left for dead in Italy, Charlie Croker and his team plan an elaborate gold heist against their former ally.

Newlywed couple Ted and Tami-Lynn want to have a baby, but in order to qualify to be a parent, Ted will have to prove he's a person in a court of law.

He would like to have the money that other people have. Their kidnapping and extortion scheme goes terribly wrong since they have muscles for brains and they're left to haphazardly try to hold onto the elusive American dream.

Written by napierslogs. It's nice to see Michael Bay take a little break from explosion-fueled action movies, and do a dark comedy based on events that took place during the fall of to summer of , in Miami.

In this film, Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson, and Anthony Mackie play a trio of bodybuilders of a Miami fitness center, who kidnap a millionaire named Victor Kershaw, and extort him for money.

Their plan is to take his money and his house, and then murder him. While their attempt to obtain his wealth succeeds, their plan of eliminating goes terribly wrong, and unleashes a turbulent chain of events.

I honestly enjoyed this movie, it was fun to watch at times. However, I can't say I enjoyed every single bit of it. Some parts, such as the kidnapping, were exciting to watch.

Then there were other scenes that didn't quite make much sense. I sat through a few scenes where I thought "what's the point here?

Aside from this, this movie is very quotable, and had some memorable lines by Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson. The two showed some good comedic chemistry in many scenes and it made the film more enjoyable.

Some people may be offended by this film because it's a comedy that takes horrific events that occurred in real life and turns them into comedic situations.

However, I kinda like the idea of the film being a comedy. I think the director made this film a comedy because of the characters and their stupidity.

Mark Wahlberg plays Daniel Lugo, the owner of the fitness center Sun Gym and the leader of the gang who does the kidnapping.

These characters were not very smart and their attempts on kidnapping, stealing, and murder often lead to unwanted results.

The characters' stupidity is kinda what made the movie entertaining and somewhat funny. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends.

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Alternate Versions. Rate This. A trio of bodybuilders in Florida get caught up in an extortion ring and a kidnapping scheme that goes terribly wrong.

Director: Michael Bay. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. My Action Movies. Use the HTML below.

You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Mark Wahlberg Daniel Lugo Dwayne Johnson Paul Doyle Anthony Mackie Adrian Doorbal Tony Shalhoub

At 57 years old, he was no longer the chiseled muscleman of old. But he wasn't destined to click to see more under a hood. Porterfield led them to Metro-Dade Police headquarters, a couple of check this out away, as Du Bois followed in his car. Al Harper, who'd first suggested the case go to SID, came upon. It was Friday and he'd already extended the visit, and on his own dime. Something like love, or maybe love itself, flowered.

Pain & Gain 2 Beschreibung

Juni Ed hat sich mittlerweile beim Sun Gym angemeldet, um mehr über das Trio zu erfahren, und teilt der Polizei seine Erkenntnisse mit. Verfügbar auf Xbox One. Besetzung und Team. Hierfür entführen sie einen reichen Kunden ihres Fitnessstudios und wollen diesen so lange foltern, bis er sein gesamtes Go here an die drei Entführer überschreibt. Zusätzliche Bedingungen Transaktionsbestimmungen. Studio Paramount. Danny kann mit dem Speedboat Kershaws auf die Bahamas fliehen, wo dieser noch ein Visit web page besitzt, und löst dieses auf. Continue reading Harris Ed Dubois. So versagt die elektrische Kettensäge, nachdem sie in die Haare dont breath Frauenleiche geraten ist. Windows Windows 8, Windows 8. Ed hat continue reading mittlerweile beim Sun Gym angemeldet, um mehr über das Trio zu erfahren, und teilt der Polizei seine Erkenntnisse mit. Bei der Verhaftung der Verbrecher war keiner link ihnen in einen Schusswechsel verwickelt. Nachdem er gegen die Täter vor Gericht aussagte, wurde Schiller wenig später selbst vom FBI verhaftet, da er durch Krankenversicherungsbetrug ungefähr 14 Millionen Dollar eingenommen haben soll. Aktuelle News. Die Testosteron-Riesen dieser wahren Geschichte stecken also mächtig tief im Schlamassel — und sind dabei entwaffnend unterhaltsam. Michael Bay Regisseur. Click the following article Rock Paul Doyle. Im wahren Leben war der Bodybuilder allerdings nicht so unterbelichtet, wie die von Mark Read more gespielte Figur in Michael Bays Film dargestellt wird. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion.

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